english  bulgarian    
 about the project   home  documents  treaties  maps  personalities  books  chronology  bibliography  gallery  contact 
 trans.gif26.03.2017

  1. MEDIEVAL BULGARIA (VII-XIV c.)  
  2. BULGARIA BELOW OTTOMAN POWER (XV-XIX c.)  
  3. MODERN BULGARIAN STATE (1878-1944)  
  4. BULGARIAN STATE AFTER 1944  
 
MAPS
Tabula Peutingeriana. Roman Road Map (Itinarary) (4th century AD)

Austrian National Library, Vienna
Manuscript and Incunabula Collection, Cod. 324
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 872/1
The town of Keramia next to Heraclea (Bitola) is marked, where at the end of the VII c. the Bulgarians led by khan Kuber settle.

Karl von Spruner. Europe in the Second Half of the 10th Century (1854)

CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 840/201, f. 2115K.
It shows relatively precisely the territory of the Bulgarian state during the reign of Tsar Samuil with capital Ohrid.

Anonymous. French Military Map of the Balkan Peninsula (Before 1936)

French National Library, Paris
Manuscript Department, Cod. Lat. Paris. 7239
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 838/9
It shows towns conquered by the Turks, such as Skopje and Sofia, among which there is a sign erected by Bulgarians.

 

Gustaf Kombst. Ethnographic map of Europe (1843)

 

British Library – London
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 957/69
The group of the South-slavs contains the northern and the central part of the Balkan Peninsula. Croations, Serbs and Bulgarians are included inside it.

Ami Boue. Ethnographic Map of the European Part of the Ottoman State (1847)

St. St. Cyril and Methodius National Library, Sofia
The Slavonic peoples, Bulgarians and Serbs, are marked with the same color. According to Ami Boue, the ethnic boder of Bulgaria is delianated by the towns of Sozopol, Adrianople, Gjumjurdzhina, Seres, Thessalnica, Enidzhe Vardar, and Kastoria (Kostur, Greece). The towns Bitola, Ohrid and Skopje are also included in the Bulgarian ethinic territory.

 

Karl von Spruner. Europe in Rleation to its Ethnic Groups and Lanuage Boundaries (1854)

 

CSA, CoM 35, inv. 840.198 – the collection of Dr. S. Simov
The Southern Slavs are united in one language group with borders, marked in blue color. The author shows the distribution of the distinct peoples and enumerates Slovaks, Croats, Serbs and Bulgarians. The border between Serbs and Bulgarians on the Timok River is clearly depicted. The Bulgarians are shown as habitants of Bulgaria and Thracia, reaching from the north from Adrinople.

Guillaume Lejean. Ethnographic Map of the European Part of Turkey with the Vassal Autonomous States (1860)

 

St. St. Cyril and Methodius, National Library, Sofia
CSA, f. 2115K – D-r S. Simov Collection
Maps and charts, Kp. IV 224
The Bulgarian population is designated in light-green. The language barrier passes to the west of Vidin following the river Timok, to the east of Nish, to the south of Banya and Leskovats (Serbia), and includes the entire Macedonia with the towns of Debar, Struga, Ohrid, Enidzhe Vardar, passes to the north of Seres and stops short of the coast of the Aegean Sea and continues to the north and west of Adrianople towards the Black Sea.

Casimir Delamarre. Language, Ethnographic and Modern Political Map of Eastern Europe (1868)

The British Library – London
CSA, CoM 35, inv. 957/60
The range of the distribution of the Bulgarian language and the Bulgarians is thick in Moesia and Rumelia, as in the last the author includes all of Macedonia to Tessaly. In the notes to the map the author underlines that the Bulgarian language is spoken not only in Bulgaria, but also in the areas south of the Balkan Mountains in Rumelia, almost down to the Archipelago.

George Washington Bacon. Ethnographic Map of Europe (Circa 1877)

 

The British Library – London
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 957/70
The Southern Slavs are depicted with one color. The author places the Bulgarians on the terriotory, bordered by the towns of Burgas-Ohrid, Skopje, Vidin-Thessalonica, Nicopol-Seres (Sjar), Ruse-Dimotica.

 

A. Velhagen, A. Klasing. Ethnographic Map of the Balkan Peninsula (80s of the 19th century)

 

The French National Library – Paris
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 838/11
Green is the color used for designating the territory of the dispersal of the Bulgarian populace. Nisch, although it is included in the Servian territory, Skopje, Bitolia, territory around the Ohrid and Prespan lake.

 

Karl Peucker. Ethnic and Language Map of Middle Europe (1893)

 

French National Library – Paris,
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 838/15
It is clear that the the Bulgarians in the Morava Region with the towns of Nish and Pirot, the Bulgariance in Macedonia – Bitola, Skopje, round the lakes of Ohrid and Prespa, along with the Vardar River and in the environs of Seres; the Bulgarians of Eastern Thrace from Adrianople to Constantinople (Istanbul), and the Bulgarians in Northern Dobrudzha to the south of Constanta and to the east of Tulcea along the Danube bramch of St. George remain outside of the Bulgarian borders.

Ernst Debes. Europe a Language and Ethnic Map for 1880 (1895)

 

The French National Library – Paris
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 838/17
The author has related Slovenes, Croats, Serbs and Bulgarians to the groups of the Southern Slavs. The political borders of both independent Bulgarian states – the Principality of Bulgaria and Eastern Rumelia – are marked, as well as the distirubtion of the Bulgarians inside and outside of these borders. The Bulgarians inhabit territories from Burgas at the Black Sea to Skopje and Nish to the west, and from the twon of Vidin on the Danube river to the Thessalonica field to the south, from the environs of Constantinople through Eastern Thrace to Constanta and the Raselm lake to the south of the mouth of the Danube river.

 

Richard Lehmann, W. Petzold. Italy and the Balkan Peninsula. Political and Ethnic Map (1897)

 

CSA, f. 2115K – Dr. S. Simov’s Collection
The borderlines of the ethnic boundaries of the Bulgarian nation are the same with those in the map of A. Velhagen and A. Klasing (No. 10). The Bulgarians inhabit the regions of Moesia, Dobrudzha, Morava (the so-called Western Outlands, today in Servia), Mavedonia and Thrace.

 

Leon G. Niox. The Population of the Balkan Peninsula (1899)

 

British Library – London
CSA, CoM 35, Inv. No. 957/55
The author shows the Bulgarians as a dense population of Moesia,Thrace, Morava Region and especially Macedonia. With their settlements they reached down to the Aegean Sea in the area between the twon of Enos and the mouth of the river Mesta, in the region of Seres and the Thessalonica Bat.

Anonymous. Map of Balkan Peninsula after the Signing of the Peace Treaty of San-Stefano (1878)

CSA, f. 2115K – Dr. S. Simov Collection

Anonymous. Map of European Turkey to the Treaty of Berlin (1878)

CSA, f. 2115K – Dr. S. Simov Collection

 
MAPS
  Results 1 - 5 of 16
1 2 3 4  next
Tabula Peutingeriana. Roman Road Map (Itinarary) (4th century AD)
Karl von Spruner. Europe in the Second Half of the 10th Century (1854)
Anonymous. French Military Map of the Balkan Peninsula (Before 1936)
Gustaf Kombst. Ethnographic map of Europe (1843)
Ami Boue. Ethnographic Map of the European Part of the Ottoman State (1847)

ARCHIVES STATE AGENCY, Address: 5 Moskovska Str., 1000 Sofia, Bulgaria, www.archives.government.bg
Created with Face Control
, 2009